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Aging Gracefully

There’s no way around it. All organs begin to lose some function and resilience over time. By age 30, our bone and muscle density begins to diminish1. Skin, as the body’s largest organ (not to mention the most environmentally vulnerable organ), is no exception. Skin is our body’s first line of defense for all heat, light, chemical, and physical threats. We have the amazing opportunity to protect and maintain our body’s largest and most versatile organ through everyday lifestyle changes. Not only do these healthy habits help protect our skin from external threats, they can also help us age gracefully with less fine lines, superficial wrinkles, sun spots, and other tell-tale signs of age and distress. Read on to learn how to fight wrinkles and sun damage at any age.

In your 20’s, focusing on protection is key. Think sunscreen and sunglasses year-round, daily moisturizers, and avoiding tanning beds like the plague. Sunscreen should be at least SPF 30 or more. We recommend pairing your daily sunscreen with Fernblock, an innovative plant-based (Polypodium Leucotomos) product with the photo-protective properties needed to prevent superficial lines and skin cancer through daily ultraviolet exposure2. Couple these products with daily exfoliation and cleansing to ward off future wrinkles. We recommend the Clarisonic skin care brush or the Pulsaderm Buddy to scrub off dead skin cells, clean pores and enhance cleaning before applying your skin care products.

By the time you hit your 30’s, you’ll probably start to see some crow’s feet, smile lines, or worry lines. Fear not! Keep up your daily skin care routine noted above, and add Dr Barad Illuminated SkinCare to your arsenal. The holistic line can be customized to your particular skin concerns that generally become evident by this age. This is often a time that Botox or Dysport use starts, as they help control frowns and crows feet.

In your 40’s, attention to skin care is even more important. It’s a good time to add retinoids, if you haven’t done so already. Topical retinoids are considered to be somewhat of a “cure-all” for skin conditions such as acne, wrinkles, and psoriasis. They have collagen stimulating effects which smooth skin over time, as well as doing a wonderful job unclogging and cleansing pores and improving overall skin tone and pigmentation. We recommend Dr Barad Illuminated SkinCare Intense Retinol, as it combines the retinol with stem cells and unique antioxidants selected specifically because of their synergistic ability to intensify the beneficial effects of retinoids.

The 40’s are often a time that facial volume loss becomes a problem, so using fillers or Sculptra can help reverse these aging changes.

In your 50’s and beyond, it’s all about maintaining! Of course, the regimen noted above needs to continue as part of the maintenance plan. You may need to switch to a different moisturizer and add hydration, and perhaps consider bio-identical hormones. The changes in our estrogens, progesterone and testosterone levels during peri-menopause, and especially once in menopause, can reduce our body’s natural production of collagen and leave us looking and feeling dry, deflated and sallow. Fillers and Sculptra can be used to smooth deeper wrinkles, stimulate the production of collagen and recreate youthful contours. This is also a time that InstaLift, a procedure using special absorbable sutures to re-suspend facial sagging, may be beneficial.

Of course, there are benefits from lasers and light sources that can help with rejuvenation maintenance at any age! We are fortunate to have so many options to keep us looking our best and aging gracefully – without having to resort to invasive procedures.

It’s never too late (or too early) to start a healthy skin care routine for aging gracefully. Grab yourself some Dr Barad Illuminated SkinCare products to keep your skin healthy and vibrant all year long! Note that your skin care regimen may need seasonal modifications – so let us help you find the right products to address your concerns!

1 https://medlineplus.gov/ency/article/004012.htm
2 https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3257081/